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Petals of Hope


When the petals fell
She gathered them, child's play
And wove the path home.

John Paul Lederach

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Petals of Hope


When the petals fell
She gathered them, child's play
And wove the path home.

John Paul Lederach

Carole initiated and organised workshops during the immediate aftermath of the bomb in Omagh in 1998. This cross-community work involved 150+ people from Primary, Secondary and Grammar Schools together with volunteers from the public and was carried out for Omagh District Council. The result was a series of pictures created from hand-made paper including the flowers which were left in the town in the days after the bomb. Work formed an exhibition and a book called "Petals of Hope". Pictures were given to each of the families and large pieces made for each town affected. The collective exhibition was seen in Omagh, Buncrana, Belfast, Dublin, Newcastle and Madrid.

Transparencies of the images from the book formed another exhibition of the same name which was shown in Warrington and later on in Omagh at the tenth anniversary of the bomb in 2008.

 

“Being involved in this project was an incredible experience for me as an artist and definitely shaped me on a personal level. I don’t underestimate how much of a privilege it was to come along side the people of Omagh and the surrounding towns during this traumatic period. The council was exceptional in allowing this project to take place and extremely supportive to me. There was no way of anticipating the impact of the outcome: both in participation as well as the quality of the pieces produced. I will never forget this project or the people I met at that time.”

Pictures were made for each of the families of the 29 people plus 2 unborn twins who were killed in the bomb. An additional three large pieces (6ft x 8ft) where also made for the three locations to loose members of their communities. These images can be seen in the Petals of Hope book, or contact Carole directly.

Copies of “Petals of Hope” can be purchased from Omagh District Council: Click Here

Collectively, this work is mentioned as a case study in John Paul Lederach’s Book: “The Moral Imagination: The Art & Soul of Building Peace”.

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REMEMBERING: Petals of Hope


15 years on from the outpouring of compassion

REMEMBERING: Petals of Hope


15 years on from the outpouring of compassion

Fifteen years after the atrocity and original project, Carole went back to Omagh with journalist Malachi ODoherty and engaged with some of the community who were involved in the Petals of Hope experience in 1998. They listened to conversations from various people who responded to our public invitation, as they where involved at one aspect or another of the original project. This became a longitudinal study of the creative process and the impact on the community at such as critical and painful time.

As you will hear when you listen to the stories, some left flowers, cleared them away as part of their council job, took part as a child or young person in the workshops as part of the arts project through their school or as a member of the Carrickmore sewing group, while others received pictures as bereaved families. They acknowledged that many, for their own reasons, had decided that their involvement stays within those early days of 1998-99. This too, was fine. They  respected their silence but all continue to be invited to listen or read the collection of experiences.

 

 

 

 

One fundamental theme shines through both phases of this creative expression and may be the reason, if any, why this tactile process has worked.  In a simple play technique, we mixed mulch and pulp with delicate flowers, into basins of water, piece by piece, practicing the ritual of rhythmic movement. This allowed us to find feeling from our hands to our hearts, as our heads tried or maybe stopped trying to make sense for a while. 

By working alone or in small groups, in silence and humility, without questions, hope started to appear and like a sea-change, we were changed. The result has given a different sense of worth in this memorial.

To find the written, audio and digital stories please go to:

http://www.omaghpetals.blogspot.co.uk

 

 

Talk presented in October 2014 at the HOLYWELL - DiverseCity Community Partnership, Derry- Londonderry:

 

 

 

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Creative Responses To Peacebuilding


Creative Responses To Peacebuilding


Examples of projects which were devised and delivered by Carole during her time as a Development Officer for the WorkersEducational Association. These case studies are creative responses to Community Development and involve community groups in and around Belfast.


 

Both MOMA Belfast and Whispering Belfast ran as part of the Creative Legacies programmes set up by Belfast City Council and programme and was funded by the European Regional Development Fund under the Peace III programme.

MOMA Belfast

Murals on Museum Activity, Belfast brought colour to the walls of the Ulster Museum and community centers across Belfast.
In October 2010, the Ulster Museum hosted a stunning exhibition called MOMA Belfast, which comprised of digital murals and creative collages illustrating future visions of the city from the perspectives of citizens from interface communities in Belfast. This group was made up from the three community centres across Belfast: Forthspring Inter- community Group, the Vine Centre, and Ballynefeigh Community Development Association and art partner support was carried out by the Ulster Museum.

Background to the project can be found here:

http://weabelfast.weebly.com

A short documentary describing the background to the MOMA Belfast project can be found below:

 

Visual presentation of the artwork can be seen here:

 

 

Whispering Belfast

The Whispering Belfastproject involved participants from the Vine Centre and Forthspring Intercommunity Group, Belfast. The drama aspect of this experience was delivered by Charmaine McBride.

They created puppets, whose characters have been uniquely shaped by past or present secret conversations. By using drama, story-gathering and visual art techniques, the demeanour and decoration of the puppets reflected how Belfast-life has also shaped the characters of the participants.

Three of the puppets in particular represented one of Belfasts biggest issues and a poignant theme in the projectthe peace walls. A puppet was created to represent the walls, with an anonymous white mask for a face and the body decorated in maps of the city and newspaper clippings about the walls. It was flanked on either side by a puppet of First Minister Peter Robinson and Deputy First Minister Martin McGuinness.

Link to the background of the work:

 

An exhibition showcasing an audio narrative and collection of Belfast puppets, hushed voices and withdrawn attitudes, was on display in the Ulster Museum in August, 2013.

 

Both MOMA Belfast and Whispering Belfast ran as part of the Creative Legacies programmes set up by Belfast City Council and programme and was funded by the European Regional Development Fund under the Peace III programme.

 

 

Community aRTS PARTNERSHIP


I am a project coordinator for Landmarks (visual art) project and facilitating artist for CAP.

Community aRTS PARTNERSHIP


I am a project coordinator for Landmarks (visual art) project and facilitating artist for CAP.

Carryduff Playcare Centre

Carryduff Playcare Centre

I coordinate the Landmarks Project for Community Arts Partnership (CAP). I was also the facilitating artist who worked at Carryduff Playcare Centre where we made collages based on Superheros in the group.

Further information (including a short film) about our work can be found on:

http://comartspartner.org/news/community-arts-partnership-landmarks-project-carryduff-playcare-group-january-update/

Further information about the full Landmarks Project for 2015-2016 can also be found on:

http://comartspartner.org/?submit=search&s=landmarks